Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Department of Pharmacology
Skip to main content

Seminars & Events

Attend one of our events. View the calendar below to see what’s coming up.

Sep

11

Novel Neural Messengers - 4th Annual Narahashi Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology is proud to present Solomon H. Snyder, M.D., Distinguished Service Professor of Neuroscience, Pharmacology and Psychiatry, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as the speaker for the 4th Annual Narahashi Lecture. Please join us for a reception in the Ryan Family Atrium immediately following the lecture The following, is an overview of this seminar, as described by Dr. Snyder: Criteria for what constitutes a neurotransmitter had traditionally been rigid, requiring existence of the substance in nerve terminals, release by depolarization, actions on a postsynaptic membrane protein receptor and whatever other criteria suited the critic’s fancy. In recent decades, decidedly atypical substances have emerged as messenger molecules, notably gases such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide as well as D-amino acids. The lecture will highlight this diversity, focusing in particular on novel insights regarding hydrogen sulfide with clinical ramifications in Huntington Disease.

more

Sep

18

"Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity by Anchored Kinase and Phosphatase Signaling Complexes"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology is pleased to welcome Dr. Mark Dell'Acqua, PhD, Professor and Vice-Chair, Department of Pharmacology, The University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. The following, is an overview of this seminar, as described by Dr. DellAcqua: The Dell’Acqua laboratory studies receptor-second messenger and kinase/phosphatase signaling in the nervous system. In particular, we study the role of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 anchoring of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase 2B-calcineurin (CaN) in regulating signaling by neuronal L-type voltage gated calcium channels and AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors during excitatory synaptic plasticity. We seek to understand how PKA and CaN in these signaling complexes rapidly control AMPA receptor and L-channel phosphorylation, activity, trafficking, and signaling to the nucleus during hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). We are investigating these processes during normal synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory as well as in the context of plasticity alterations and cognitive impairments found in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer’s Disease. We employ a variety of experimental approaches to study the assembly of AKAP signaling complexes, their localization in cells, and their functional control of ion channel currents, receptor trafficking, and learning and memory. These techniques range from advanced quantitative fluorescence imaging methods to synaptic and ion channel electrophysiology to neurobehavioral analyses of AKAP mutant mice that are selectively deficient in PKA or CaN anchoring  

more

Sep

25

"Structure-guided Drug Discovery and Structural Genomics"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology is pleased to welcome Northwestern's own Dr. Wayne F. Anderson, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. Structural genomics approaches and methods have greatly sped up structural biology research and are having an impact on structure-guided drug discovery. High throughput methods can rapidly provide detailed information on atomic interactions between small molecules and target proteins. Having access to the structures of sets of proteins that are desired targets in the presence of a variety of ligands as well as proteins that should not be targeted is an advantage for optimizing hits from screens. Another area that benefits from high throughput structure determination is function discovery. By examining whole systems of proteins that function together, structural insights can aid in defining the functions of the system and suggest further experiments. Examples taken from the work of the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases will be used to illustrate applications of structural genomics approaches.

more

Back to top